Search found 99 matches

by schoppenhauer
Fri Feb 12, 2010 11:23 am
Forum: Common Lisp
Topic: Slime: Windows SBCL with Cygwin Emacs
Replies: 7
Views: 7488

Re: Slime: Windows SBCL with Cygwin Emacs

The reason why I want to keep Cygwin's Emacs is that I want one emacs for all things I do, I dont want to maintain multiple .emacs-files. In Scheme, I wrote a little script ;; hack for mzscheme substrings in petite (define old-substring substring) (define (substring str x . y) (if (pair? y) (old-sub...
by schoppenhauer
Thu Feb 11, 2010 7:17 pm
Forum: Common Lisp
Topic: Slime: Windows SBCL with Cygwin Emacs
Replies: 7
Views: 7488

Re: Slime: Windows SBCL with Cygwin Emacs

Are you sure Clisp is not fast enough, did you test it? Some people tested it and it worked well enough. And ECL is supported in Windows, but you will have to compile it using Cygwin or Microsoft Visual C++ Toolkit (the later is recommended). Clisp wasnt fast enough one year ago. Its the ffi-calls....
by schoppenhauer
Thu Feb 11, 2010 2:02 pm
Forum: Common Lisp
Topic: Slime: Windows SBCL with Cygwin Emacs
Replies: 7
Views: 7488

Re: Slime: Windows SBCL with Cygwin Emacs

Ok, I tried clozure. Directly connecting via TCP works (would be a solution if nothing else works). But when starting through emacs, it complains that it cannot find the given lisp-file swank-loader.lisp, since it has a cygwin-path, not a windows-path. I had similar problems with petite scheme. I ju...
by schoppenhauer
Thu Feb 11, 2010 6:03 am
Forum: Common Lisp
Topic: Slime: Windows SBCL with Cygwin Emacs
Replies: 7
Views: 7488

Re: Slime: Windows SBCL with Cygwin Emacs

Whats a good alternative then? CLISP works but is too slow for graphics output with lispbuilder-sdl. I could try ECL but it will certainly also be comparably slow (and isnt yet supported afaik).

Maybe Clozure? I read it has x86_64 support also for Windows, but not yet tried it.
by schoppenhauer
Thu Feb 11, 2010 2:57 am
Forum: Common Lisp
Topic: Slime: Windows SBCL with Cygwin Emacs
Replies: 7
Views: 7488

Slime: Windows SBCL with Cygwin Emacs

Hello. I currently changed to windows, and I am currently using the Emacs from Cygwin (and actually I want to keep it that way if possible). I installed slime and it works well with clisp. Unfortunately there is no SBCL which is compatible with Cygwin it seems, so I installed the Windows-Version of ...
by schoppenhauer
Sat Jan 30, 2010 6:29 pm
Forum: Common Lisp
Topic: Why have the let function when you already have setf?
Replies: 16
Views: 6880

Re: Why have the let function when you already have setf?

Could you expand on this? Why is let stateless and setf isn't? Ok, sorry, "state" is not quite the concept - its about side effects. A let-statement overloads the value of a variable, but does not cause any side effects. See referential transparency for more details on this. Why have a variable at ...
by schoppenhauer
Sat Jan 30, 2010 4:51 pm
Forum: Common Lisp
Topic: Why have the let function when you already have setf?
Replies: 16
Views: 6880

Re: Why have the let function when you already have setf?

yougene wrote:So each used variable has its own stack of possible bindings?
At least that is one possibility to imagine (and specify) what is being done. I.e., this is the model. The implementation itself is mostly different.
by schoppenhauer
Sat Jan 30, 2010 4:04 pm
Forum: The Lounge
Topic: Why is cons-cell-notation infixed?
Replies: 2
Views: 4081

Why is cons-cell-notation infixed?

There is something I always wondered ... Since in most cases Lisp prefers prefixed notations, why are cons-cells written in the form (A . B), which is an infix-notation as far as I see. Of course, when parsing a list, and creating its data structure, this notation does not really make the situation ...
by schoppenhauer
Sat Jan 30, 2010 3:45 pm
Forum: Common Lisp
Topic: Why have the let function when you already have setf?
Replies: 16
Views: 6880

Re: Why have the let function when you already have setf?

Setf changes the value of an existing variable (well, it can create new ones, but it isnt supposed to do so) in the current scope, while let creates a new scope and - if necessary - overloads old variable namings by new ones. That is, let doesnt set any variables at all. Formally, you could think of...
by schoppenhauer
Sat Dec 26, 2009 8:26 pm
Forum: Common Lisp
Topic: Framebuffer with Common Lisp
Replies: 1
Views: 1718

Framebuffer with Common Lisp

I have an old ThinClient which crashes when running XDMCP. There is one VNC-Client for the Framebuffer, but it has strange Keybindings. So - since I wanted to get familiar with this protocol anyway - I will maybe try to write a VNC-Client in Common Lisp. My question is if there is any Binding for Di...